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. >> thank you mr. herring -- mr. kelly, sorry. thank you, i am barbara hale, assistant general manager for power. by way of updates item four i just wanted to remind you in your packets is a detailed timeline for implementation of our cca program. we also are in working constructively with lafco in their advisory role to the board in implementation our cca program we are operating under a memorandum of understanding with lafco that describes the roles and responsibilities of our respective staff and we expect that as we get to actual program launch we will come back to you with a new mou that describes our ongoing relationship at the time. the mou we're operating under this point is expired but i think we're both comfortable to serve those roles until the program takes better shape and we can then revisit roles and responds with that information in hand. then the other item i wanted to make mention of by way of update is some of our activities at the california public utilities commission. we did go forward with the filing of our revised implementation agreement, implementation pla
brennan recounts the life of the former first lady who died in 1993. ms. brennan discusses her use of mrs. nixon's recently released private documents. this is just under 50 minutes. >> welcome to the richard nixon presidential library and museum. my name is paul and i'm the acting director of the library. i appreciate all of you coming to one of our continuing author talk recitations. today, we are very fortunate to have really the leading scholar on pat nixon who is by the way of warren 100 years ago this year. mary brennan, did much who did much of her research here for her book, is the chair of the department of history at the university of texas and san marcos. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movement and she has written to date, three different books those being turning right at the 60's, conservator capture of the gop, wives, mothers and the conservative women conservative women in the crusade against communism and of course the book we love the most around here which is "pat nixon" embattled first lady. her book is an outstanding work and i look forward to -- i w
to retake it. but behind the scenes there was conflict with mr. reagan urging her to negligent a truce which she angrily rejected and her asking for his support. you are the only person who will understand. she was not always happy with his responses, describing one of his late night messages regarding the faulk lands invasion, so vague i didn't think it was worth reading. one letter shows the woman the british nicknamed the iron lady could have a velvet side adding a p.s. to the president who was a bit under the weather. warm personal regards and a rapid recovery to full health and strength. the world needs you. yours sincerely, margaret thatcher. >> the documents released by britain's national archives also shows her asking british counterparts for fashion advice about what mr. reagan should wear for a horseback ride with the queen during a june 1982 visit. the answer smart but casual not formal riding attire, advice the president took. the british were concerned that it had taken the president so long to respond to the queen's invitation to that visit a white
that the u.s. secretary of state contracted a stomach virus that left her severely dehydrated. on her return home, she collapsed and severed a concussion. during a follow-up examination, doctors have discovered a blood clot. mrs. clinton is being kept under observation in this bill york hospital, receiving medication, and will remain here for the next 48 hours at least. she has been offered for the past three weeks. her illness prevented her from testifying before congress about the attack on u.s. diplomatic mission in benghazi. that killed the ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans. the department faced severe criticism. mrs. clinton who is the most traveled secretary of state in u.s. history is due to step down in the new year. many democrats want her to run for the presidency in 2016. her health is likely to be a major factory in making any decision. >> concerned about the health of the venezuelan president hugo chÁvez, suffering of further complications after cancer surgery in cuba. a television address, the vice president said mr. chÁvez's helped remains delicate. >>
word album at this year's grammys. so, choose for yourself. here's mrs. obama's childhood memory, from her book about the white house garden. >> our apartment didn't have a dining room. so, we ate at the kitchen table. and unless my dad was working the evening shift at his job at the city water plant, we ate our meals together, as a family. >> and her opponent, president clinton, reading his book, "back to work." >> i earned my first money mowing lawns when i was 12. at 13, i worked at a small grocery store. >> so, it is game on for the two of them. >>> and speaking of game on, basketball powerhouse kobe bryant, way to go. the youngest player ever to reach a milestone and watch. it's his 30,000th point. joining the ranks of michael jordan, kareem abdul-jabbar. kobe has now spent half his life playing in the nba and we decided to go back and find his first point ever. there it was, a free throw. he was 18 years old, bookends for a truly amazing athlete. and, be sure to tweet me your thoughts for the "instant index," @dianesawyer. >>> and coming up, want to give the perfect gift? scienti
to rename this ira the kay bailey hutchison spousal ira in her honor, and i hope, mr. president, we can join together and honor senator hutchison by getting that done before we close out our business this year. kay, of course, has always championed the state sales tax deduction, which may not seem like a big deal to others in this carriage carriages but it . but it is a big deal in texas. we don't have a state income tax. but we do pay a state sales tax. and of course kay has also worked to reduce the marriage penalty tax. she's been a strong defender of taxpayer interests and her efforts have made the tax code less hostile to saving and to families. she alluded to her great work with nasa. she's one of the senate's leading supporters of nasa and human space flight, and of course gnaws i nasa has contribd historic technological breakthroughs that have benefited all americans. kay appreciated the importance of basic scientific research to long-term american prosperity and she appreciates the role that nasa has played in fostering innovation. she's long said and advocated for support for nasa
none other than majority leader nancy pelosi. listen to her advice to mr. boehner. >> do you know what it was like for me to bring a bill to florida to fund the war in iraq? it's tough. but you have to do it. so is the point that you don't want to put your members on the spot? figure it out. we did. figure it out. >> figure it out. sound advice. >> we did. [ laughter ] >> it's true, i think that pelosi, that example, is a really vivid one, if nothing else. considering the opposition that the democrats had. the compromise that she had to make. and, as i said, there are compromising going on that we don't know about. a lot of what boehner is doing is posturing in order to appeal to people on the base and to donors. he needs to look like he fought the good fiegts. in public, it needs to look like he's really standing up for conservative principles, however confused those may be. and, in private, he may be making deals. he's known to be a man who is good at that kind of politics. this is sort of the thing where it is interesting to see that the republicans are making a bet that this postur
greatly. they are senator kay bailey hutchison and senator scout brown. mr. president, in her marvelous book entitled "american heroines: the spirited women who shaped our country," senator kay bailey hutchison wrote the following: "no history can be written appropriately without acknowledging the part women have played in building the greatness of our country. end quote. as my valued colleague and good friend begins a new chapter in her life, i hope that she finds the time to add a new chapter to her own book, one that will be fascinating, inspiring, and auto biographical. like the women that kay celebrates, says an author from amelia earheart, from sally barton to condoleezza rice, kay bailey hutchison is a pioneer, a breaker of barriers. in the special election of 1993, the people of texas made her the first woman to represent them in the united states senate. in the three regular elections since then, they have confirmed their trust in her by ever increasing margins. as the leader of the senate commerce committee, kay has been a strong voice for transportation systems, better, effic
of her time. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. bilirakis: mr. speaker, i have no further speakers. does the gentlelady have further speakers? ms. hochul: i'd like to yield such time to the ranking member of the homeland subcommittee on transportation security, homeland security, the gentlewoman from texas, ms. jackson lee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from texas is recognized. ms. jackson lee: i want to thank the gentlelady from new york and i want to say first of all this will not be the last that we hear of your voice. and what a stupendous voice you have. thank you so very much for making this time on the floor a time that pays tribute to veterans, but also recognizes the outstanding service that you've given to this nation, to the committee on homeland security and your other committees, but more importantly, the passion that you've shown as a true american. i hope that we heed the voice that you just lifted up, that we owe to veterans not only this great legislation, but also the ability to come together and work on their behalf and all americans. again, t
to the house that she has on her agenda. mr. sessions: the gentleman is correct and we expect those. mr. woodall: this is the kind of house, deliberative house, i came to be part of two short years ago. we have the ability to get these things done in the next few days. i reject the idea that i read over and over again that this house has been delaying action this house got it right wetch got it right in a budget in april of 2011, we got it right in our budget in 2012, we got it right when we passed aest sequester replacement and we're getting it right with this rule today. with that, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from new york. ms. slaughter: i'm pleased to yield one minute to the gentlelady from california, our leader, ms. pelosi. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. pelosi: thank you very much, madam chair. ranking member. thank you, mr. speaker. why did i sort of smell smoke when i heard this debate? it's reminiscent of nero fiddling while rome burned. the american people are waiting for us to get the
states senate, i present this pin to mrs. inouye in honor of her husband because she gave so many gifts to us. he was a lion in the senate, a real american hero. he was a fierce warrior when it came to fighting for his nation or standing up for hawaii. he received his medal of honor to his wife and pearl harbor. .. he cherished his love for hawaii and its people. now his style was one of absolute stability. he was the one who believed that believe that the decorum of the senate enabled the senate to do the peoples business. he was the essence of stability and he showed that often good manners was good politics that led to good politics. he did not argue the loudest and instead he worked diligently. he marshaled his arguments and with quiet determination he won the day. has a former appropriator i saw that he really got through the air marks. he loved in mark's and what did he do with those earmarks? i can tell you. he made sure that we looked after indian tribes. he made sure we looked after the poorest of the poor in hawaii. his superfund site that had been left by his legacy and he ma
of 18 pay. -- 35 he is egger to win a conviction. by this time mrs. thorton is going forward and come to the defense of her alleged assail i can't and says in the trial at arthur never lifted the ax she never believed he intended to hurt her she felt safe in his presence. he was just -- and she wanted the it to go away. and he did this and this and managed to get ore people to override the testimony. so arthur is convicted. there's only one punishment for that which is the death penalty. and so arthur bowen goes on to death row, and? january of 1836, is sentenced to death. and with the clock ticking, mrs. thorton does something even more -- it was amazing snuff enough she had testified on arthur's behalf on criminal trial. she starts out recruiting her friends in high society and she was very prominent woman. many prominent friend, easy access to the leadership of the country. she weptd to the vice president van buren and said use your good officings with the president jackson, tell him he should pardon arthur, you know. his mother is very good and, you know, she
the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. . mr. connolly: i rise in support of h.r. 3159. i would like to thank my colleague from texas, mr. poe, for his leadership on this legislation. he and his staff have worked to address a range of technical issues so this bill could be considered under suspension. h.r. 3159 is an important first step in bringing oversight to the foreign aid process. the first is to strengthen monitoring and evaluation so we be sure our aid is performing as intended. we make most of our decisions in the dark. we set budgets year after year without having any idea necessarily what the outcomes might be. this bill requires the president to establish a consistent set of guidelines so that all federal agencies will set measurable goals and monitor results and evaluate impact. we can make much better decisions about how and where to invest once we know which types of programs are the most cost effective and produce the best results. the second reform is to increase
is recognized. mr. berman: i would like to thank the sponsor of this legislation, ms. ros-lehtinen, for her leadership on this issue and her work in addressing the north korean threat. earlier this month, north korea carried out a missile launch using ballistic missile technology in correct defiance of the international community this important resolution condemns their launch, calls on the north korea to live up to its commitments, admere to its international obligations and deal piecefully with its neighbors. this is a blatant violation of the u.n. security council resolutions. 1718 and 1874. we urge the security council to take strong and concerted action to demonstrate that pyongyang's actions are completely unacceptable. in familiar -- in particular we call on china and russia to work construct ily with other members of the council to show that the international community is united in condemning north korea's provocative behavior. north korea is only further isolating itself with its irresponsible action and the development of ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons will never bring the
: the gentlelady yields back the balance of her time. the gentleman from new jersey. mr. lobiondo: continue to reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from washington. mr. larsen: thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to yield two minutes to the gentlelady from oregon, ms. bonamici. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. bonamici: i rise in support of h.r. 2838 to protect our marine economy, protect our maritime borders and protect the brave coast guard personnel, including the personnel of the sector columbia river which is headquartered in oregon's first congressional district. i thank the coast guard subcommittee for their work on this and the full and ranking member of the full transportation and infrastructure committee. in supporting the basic mission of the coast guard, this bill includes language to re-authorize another important mission carried out, noaa's marine debris program. in june of this year, coastal residents in my home state of oregon found a 66-foot dock resting on a beach near the town of new port, oregon. the dock was just
agree with her completely, mr. speaker. it's very important that we not let the sequester take place and i hope and believe that she is right, that we will not see that happen. and number two, i'd like to associate myself with her remarks as it relates to ensuring that we do not go over the fiscal cliff. that's something that is very, very desired on our part as well. i'd also like to respond to just one point very quickly, mr. speaker, before i yield to my good friend from roseville, and say that i can provide my friend from rochester, our distinguished ranking member of the rules committee, assurance that we will not be adjourning the congress today and ending our work. i have said, i said in the rules committee, mr. speaker, that we are going to continue with our work. the action that we're going to take as it relates to these two measures, again, the reconciliation package, which is designed to ensure that, as my friend from rochester has said, that we don't see sequestration which we all know would be devastating, take effect, it is a package of $238 billion over a 10-year perio
. just let's get started. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i think the gentlelady. i also think her for 15 years. we talked about having union station is a true intermodal center. we used to have our people come to the greyhound station to three plot, drag their luggage to union station. we used to go around town to take a bus with satellite location. ms. norton was with me and in 15 minutes we got it done, dedicated, came up for that jury in a very heated election. they thank you for your leadership. not the secretary come but the deputy secretary was instrumental in making nation's capital headteacher intermodal center. i think both of you. ms. edwards. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to thank all of our witnesses today and particularly thank secretary lahood. i understand it's your birthday. i don't think i would've chosen to spend my birthday with you, but i'm glad you've chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion today about high-speed rail. we had a chance to begin a half ago to go up to new york and less amtrak, but
judge and i look forward to her nomination -- confirmation today. and with that, mr. president, i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? mr. cornyn: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from texas. mr. cornyn: mr. president, can you tell me how much time is remaining on this side? the presiding officer: 15 minutes. mr. cornyn: thank you. mr. president, it's become disturbingly clear that president obama doesn't mind whether or not we drive off the fiscal cliff. just last week, his own treasury secretary, secretary geithner, said the white house was -- quote -- "absolutely" prepared to go off the cliff unless republicans agree to raise marginal tax rates. in other words, during a period of high unemployment -- the highest since the great depression -- the president's willing to risk another recession in order to increase taxes on small businesses and the people we depend upon to create jobs. how much revenue will the president's tax hike generate? well, by raising the top two rates, it would produce only about $68 billion in 2013. i say "only," because in relationship to
: the gentlewoman reserves the balance of her time. the gentleman from texas. mr. smith: madam speaker, i yield as much time as he may consume to the gentleman from oklahoma, mr. cole, who is the sponsor of this legislation. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes the gentleman from oklahoma. mr. cole: i thank you, madam speaker, and i thank the gentleman for yielding. and i would like to ask, madam speaker, at the appropriate time if i could submit a written statement on this particular piece of legislation. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. cole: i had a long oration i was going to make but i want to be quite honest. my good friend, chairman smith, and my good friend, chairman lofgren, have covered the case well or better than i can. they're both drished -- distinguished attorneys. they understand the intricacies involved here. so there's no need for me to go through and repeat the points that they've made. i do want to make one central point or two points. first i want to thank both of them. this is a matter of justice. this is a bipartisan effort, to try and make sure th
, i'm glad he's having fun because that jumper does look painful. >> this is baby mrs. claus, this is four and a half-month-old zara. zara lives in canada and loves to dance and be in her jolly jumper. >> she's like a jolly elf. >> she's got fancy footwork. couldn't you watch this all day, every time you get in a bad mood, too full from the food you play zara on the loop. i just want to get therein and dance with her. she makes it look like so much fun. >> she's the cutest kid. she's a little christmas -- >> miracle. >> christmas peach. ♪ going to be a happy christmas day ♪ >>> creepy christmas greetings from a man, a mum, and a cat. ♪ >> he didn't let the holiday season go by with a little snowman. >> that goes on, over and over again. he's standing there like a snowman. people think, oh, should i stop and help. i'm surprised nobody trips and falls because it's raining and slippery. >> that's his m. ol, freaking them out when they don't expect it. >> they don't expect frosty to move around. >> at one point the cameraman says, can you fix this for me? >> they still are
congress. i yield to the gentleman from louisiana. mr. scalise: i thank the gentlelady for her leadership, not only for hosting this hour but for being so passionate about the need to control spending, and the need to get the economy back on track. she was talking about about solutions to avert the fiscal cliff. if if you look at how we got here, nothing gets resolved out of washington, it's an abyss that doesn't need to happen. if you just go back and look at the promises made by poth because massachusetts when he was running for office, when he was running for re-election, he talked about working across the aisle he talked about bipartisan solutions he talked about it a lot and the american people expected that the president would keep that promise. but before the ink was even dry, before some of the states had confirmed and finalized their vote totals for this last election, the president comes out with a hyper partisan solution that's his approach. when the president comes out with his plan to raise taxes on some, not renew ores, to threaten middle class families with a tax increase i
: there is no way secretary clinton steps down and new secretary of state is in place, there is no way to call mrs. clinton back to testify? >> we hope that she will fulfill her desire to come before our committee. we hope that will happen. they have not shut the door on that, but i know as robert frost says, who knows what will happen. we have every expectation she will. that is our strict request and we hope she makes good on it. >> arthel: is there any way to ensure that these hearings will not be politicized? if you want the american people to get the real answers you have to keep politics out of it. >> it's very hard to keep politics out of anything we do in congress. what we're talking about is terrorist attack with four americans lost their lives, even though they requested more security and more help. we want to know what went wrong and to prevent another benghazi. american lives are at stake all over the world. we are targets. we want to make sure that another benghazi is not going to happen and only way you can do that is examine what happened with this one. >> arthel: congresswoman, tha
's having. >> reporter: and nearly ten years before that whenned miler made her motion picture debut. ♪ >> reporter: of course, the two have gone on to make us laugh year after year. he was mr. saturday night. >> we were just trying to get back at our ex-husbands. >> reporter: she started a first wives club. >> you have to pay. >> reporter: they are two stars whose stars never crossed -- until now. >> it was a thrill that you offered me the gig. >> well, there was no one else. >> reporter: that's sweet. do you mean that? >> everybody else didn't make sense with me. >> reporter: oh, come on, meryl turned you down. face it. >> all right. >> we're back. did you have fun with the boys? look at this place! we're going to have to call fema. >> reporter: the film also stars three adorable kids and marisa tomei as their uptight mother. but this one isn't just about the laughs. >> well, as the great yogi berra once said, it ain't over till it's over. >> reporter: crystal plays artie, a minor league baseball announcer. >> i love this job. i'm fired? >> he's just lost his job. what is he goin
thought perhaps it was because mrs. reagan needed time too consult her astrologer and decide if it was an auspicious moment for such a trip. jeff. >> thank you. it leads you to wonder. there's no indication that progress is being made behind the scenes. >> you'd like to hope. >> one would hope, right. >>> the atlanta braves haven't used their screaming indian logo since the reagan years, but the controversial logo will be brought back next season as part of the team's new batting practice hats. they started using the screaming indian in 1984. they stopped because of the fwraups offended of that on sports uniforms. >>> experts say that more than half the ones available now are fake. elvis presley tops this year's list of the most forged celebrity signatures. last time we checked he hadn't signed a signature in a while. he's followed by the beatles, first man on the moon, armstrong, and people are still forge kennedy's autograph. >> there's no faking this. here are the most annoying words of 2012. this one, jeff? >> amazing? would that be in there? >> we'll see. for the fourth
of the fiscal cliff. mr. mccain: may i thank the senator from maryland, as always, for her usual courtesy and i think she had a very important message and i appreciate not only the words themselves but her eloquence and passion. mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the senator from south carolina be included in a colloquy during my remarks. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: mr. president, i, like i believe all of us just finished watching the president's remarks at -- i guess it was the executive office building. and i'm not sure yet as i sort out my impressions of the president's remarks as to whether to be angry or to be saddened. i've been around this town for a number of years, and as is well known, i had an interest in the presidency more than academic and i've watched a lot of presidents, going back to president reagan from the standpoint of a member of congress. and i've watched these other crises as we go through them, whether it be the potential shutdown of the government when newt gingrich was speaker of the house, we've seen these other crises as the debt l
homeschooled, and listen while providing mr. inhofe if oklahoma who home schools her kids and fears that somehow this convention would hand the power to an unelected group of international bureaucrats to direct the schooling of children and oklahoma. .. if you know what i do and you you. thank you. >> i welcome senator from iowa. >> it has been inspirational to watch them work together in a bipartisan fashion and to bring us to this point. i just hope that you we do not lose that in terms of the vote. i just came over from the dirksen building where we had a wonderful building honoring bob dole. mr. president, some time ago, i went back and i read senator dole's speech on the senate floor. april 14, 1969. mr. president, i would ask that it be included in my remarks that this speech be printed in the record. >> without objection. >> he spoke of the future. of people with disabilities in america. and what we needed to do to change our society. that was 1969, it is 21 years later when we passed the americans with disabilities act. the country has changed so much for the better because
and politically savvy. >> madison loved every minute of it. mrs. byrne -- mrs. monroe hated it. >> she warned her husband. you cannot rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute. >> during the statement you are a little breathless and there was too much looking down. i think it with a little too fast. not enough change of pace. >> probably the most tragic of all our first ladies. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said i myself never made any decisions. i only decided what was important and when to present it to my husband. you stop and think about how much power that is, it is a lot of power. >> part of the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at these bugaboos and make it possible for people to survive and to flourish as a result. i do not know how many presidents realistically have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white house grounds, i'm constantly reminded about all of the people who lived there before and particularly, all of the women. >> fi
it faster and their model is ready, and i will concede, just let's get started. thank you, mr. chairman. >> i also thank her for 15 years, having union station, a true intermodal center, used to have people come to the greyhound station, drag their luggage to union station, we used to go around town to take a bus, and some satellite location and 15 months we have got that done and dedicated, came up for that during a very heated election but i thank you for your leadership. not this secretary but deputy secretary was instrumental in thanking the nation's capital having a true intermodal, like most of you. >> i want to thank our witnesses for being with us and i want to thank secretary ray lahood. it is your birthday. i would not have chosen to spend my birthday with you but glad you have chosen to spend your birthday with us. particularly to the chairman for holding this hearing and discussion -- a week and half ago to go to new york, bless amtrak forever, even on the assumption, and i do share your view, we have a densely populated corridor in the northeast, that requires no bust devel
here. mr. adelson, how much mon are you going to spend on the election? >> i did not touch her. she ran back into me. she just grabbed our camera. >> i know you were against the war in iraq, that is ok -- but you thought the war in afghanistan was -- was ok -- you thought that was worth doing. we did not check with the russians to see how they did there for 10 years. [laughter] but we did it. it was -- you know -- it was something -- to be thought about. >> when david koch sat down last night as a member of the u.s. delegation, i went over to ask a question. >> do you think unchecked concentration of wealth will undermine democracy? >> i could not quite hear you. i am deaf in one ear. >> we are not doing any interviews. >> president obama promised to begin to slow the rise of the oceans. [laughter] [applause] and to heal the planet. [laughter] my promise is to help you and your family. >> one of the first acts of civil disobedience at the democratic national convention took place on tuesday just outside the time warner cable center. >> we are here to ask president obama, who we need a p
-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from that sexual assault that night in 1985 was not tested for 20 years. it sat on the shelf in a crime lab somewhere in dallas, texas, because the dallas police department had a new incentive to go and look at those old cases, this case was looked at. that evidence was tested and the dallas police department decided that kevin glenn turner committed this crime back in 1985. but that was 20 years ago. the statute of limitations had run and justice could not occur and lavenia's case, because the system waited too long to find t
." because she was in her doughnut hole. well, a couple weeks later, mrs. johnson would be back in the hospital. how wasteful is that? how -- why? why is that -- that costs a tremendous amount of money to our system. this is saving money. this is health care reform. this is medicare reform. it's improving people's health and saving money at the same time. so we have increased benefits, we've extended the life of medicare. that was done as part of health care reform. that is medicare reform. now, in the election, we had a discussion about this. there were a lot of ads about it. we know what governor romney would have done to medicare. he said very explicitly that -- and, again, the presiding officer has quoted this. he said very explicitly he would restore those billions and billions of dollars in overpayments to private insurance companies for no reason, for no good effect, just so that i guess these insurance companies could have more profit. instead, we reinvested this money into medicare. but he would have given it to the insurance companies. he would have replaced the health
of grandpa. mr. bush's daughter, jenna bush hager, announcing she is pregnant with her first child. the former president says he is quote, fired up about becoming a grandfather. how about that? former first lady laura bush is thrilled with the news. it will be the cowell's first grandchild. she and her husband were married the at texas ranch. you might remember photos from the beautiful wedding. congratulations to all of them. jon? jon: let's hope that goes well. that will be great. construction projects, jenna are usually a hopeful sign of a rebounding economy. but if far too many areas these projects are grinding to a halt. in hard hit new york city half finished residential or commercial buildings are all too common sight. senior correspondent eric shawn is live in brooklyn with a look why. >> reporter: hi, jon. they are empty monuments to a bad economy. unfished buildings like this one you can see just stopped in mid-construction. officials say this is problem throughout new york city. likely from the economic crisis from 2008. they say it is issue of bank financing that instit
of the country turned to something else. it's interesting. if you look at 1968, mrs. johnson, lady bird johnson, wrote in her diary, there are so many people across this country who are asking what is happening to us. president johnson felt that as well, and that's when he moved on gun control. and i think, again, that if president obama wanted to use this moment he must do so i think with great swiftness. >> can i just ask you about the lbj library, which i understand opened yesterday, reopened after a big old renovation? what do you guys have there? >> well, we have a $10 million redesign of our core exhibit on president johnson. one of the wonderful things about the exhibit is we use the telephone recordings that were done throughout the course of president johnson's administration to help tell the story of this very consequential and important president. >> well, i think that's great. i also understand you have historians doris kerns good win and mark besh losh, michael beschlo beschloss, who are good friends of this show. we love to come and hear them. good to speak with you, mark updegrov
there is a tendency to form that blood clot. >> in the case of mrs. clinton we know that during an earlier illness she became light-headed, fainted and then hit her head and cuncussed. could it be a side effect of the concussion. >> concussion in adults it is not a known cause of venous signus thrombosis. in children sometimes it makes them sus-- susceptible. and given it is an uncommon condition, five in a million it is not a common condition at all. so i doubt it was directly related to concussion because in general, it is not known to be caused by that. but among possible causes, again, you are allowed it to speculate, it would be ruled out some of them like pregnancy or if there is any tendency of a blood disorder, a tendency to hypercoagulate,. >> suarez: so what do we do in treatment? and is it a long course of treatment? >> yes and no. if there is, for example n someone pregnant or just gave birth and maybe has thrombosis, about three to six months of anti-coagulation or using blood thinners would be enough. if there is no particular cause, the range from 6 to 12 months. and there are condition
. >> in the case of mrs. clinton we know that during an earlier illness she became light-headed fainted and then hit her head and cuncussed. could it be a side effect of the concussion. >> concussion in adults it is not a known cause of venous signus thrombosis. in children sometimes it makes them sus-- susceptible. and given it is an uncommon condition, five in a million it is not a common condition at all. so i doubt it was directly related to concussion because in general it is not known to be caused by that. but among possible causes again you are allowed it to speculate, it would be ruled out some of them like pregnancy or if there is any tendency of a blood disorder a tendency to hypercoagulate,. >> suarez: so what do we do in treatment? and is it a long course of treatment? >> yes and no. if there is for example n someone pregnant or just gave birth and maybe has thrombosis, about three to six months of anti-coagulation or using blood thinners would be enough. if there is no particular cause the range from 6 to 12 months. and there are conditions when it is unlimited. so to some
of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanisms, maritime energy disputes, not only in the united states and eastern mediterranean, our pick is coming up. with
her all this time but to break her heart at last? father... i've made up my mind. when mr. tackleton returns, i shall tell him that i accept his proposal. crocket's voice: see, i was determined that bertha would never get a chance to say yes. so i called together some of me mates. well, right on the dot, he arrives. bertha: do come and sit beside me, mr. tackleton. i've made tea. i shall. oh, i shall, my pretty little lady. one lump or 2? 2. oh, yes, 2, my pretty. 2, he says. coming up, matey. oh! ooh! ooh, is anything wrong? no. and now, my dear, we come to the reason for my presence here. ha ha ha. "ha ha ha." that's what you think, chum. pepper. and have you made up your pretty little mind? ha ha ha. well, to tell the truth, kind sir-- yes? ha ha ha. [ah-choo!] oh! oh, what was that? never mind. now-- [ah-choo!] well, what on earth? excuse me, my pretty-- [ah-choo!] [ah-choo! ah-choo!] it was that cricket made a fool of me. uriah, get rid of him once and for all. [squawk] and this time, no slip-ups. get professional help so you won't bungle the job. i want that cricket eliminated.
scoring partisan political points. it is her character that has made the difference. mr. president, the private acts of public figures can tell you a lot about their character. i want to share my colleagues this morning a story about olympia snowe that i witnessed personally. there was a republican fund- raiser going on one night and i was arriving late driving in a car. people weren't streaming out of the fund-raiser and each of them was passing by a man who was on crutches with only one leg, clearly destitute, clearly down on his luck, but the was asking for money. everybody but olympia snowe passing by without a word as if he were invisible. olympia went over to this destitute man on crutches with one leg and she not only handed him some money, but she took the time to talk to him. i think that tells you so much about who olympia snowe is. her kindness to this individual when everyone else was passing by. the kindness when no one was watching. her kindness to him was a private act that told all lost -- al of us so much about our character. it with her retirement from the senate,
became, i think, more excited about this legend, mr. brubeck, and she came into the room. she was very, very calm, and we gave her a poster. >> yes. >> but, man, when she went home, she just lit up all of the south of france with the stories about meeting dave brubeck. >> mr. cosby, you spent some time with him. what was he like really as a person? >> in the 1950s the music was supposed to be the music of the cool, the cool guys, you know? psychology and smool smooth. that's what he was. he brought it with it and others who know music technically like marselles. hopefully you can get him on to explain to you those -- i mean, dave was really a different kind of player. rhythmically as he was thinking with the cords. he was cool. that's whaefs. cool. >> he broke racial barriers. you talked about that a little bit. what was behind that? what was behind his thinking that he felt. >> as i have said, racism is a waste of time, and people who try to push, it keep it out front because of whae their idiocy happens to be, there are people like dave and others, et cetera, et cetera, louie armstro
,", which, you know, was profittedly based on anna wintour. your thoughts on that, mr. ambassador. >> how do you know she's not going to be the next secretary of state? why limit her to a mere ambassadorship? it wouldn't surprise me. it has been historically the case that large contributors to presidential campaigns get appointed -- megyn: and she's one of the top ten bundlers for president obama. >> and i have to tell you, i've had wide experience with political appointees -- true, mostly republicans -- and they've been very effective. i would not underestimate how important it is overseas to have somebody who knows the president personally, who could call the president if they needed to. and here's the really important thing, who cares first and foremost about the president's policy. not about what the bureaucracy at the state department wants, but about the president's policy. i'm not saying anna wintour's going to do all that -- megyn: right. >> but that is important. megyn: what does that person do? if you become the boord to the u.k., what do you do? >> well, that is one of the hardest
? >> it bothers me because it makes no sense. >> reporter: sense is something garcia's wife of 59 years thinks her husband could use. do you think he is crazy? >> uh-huh. >> reporter: call him crazy. but there is an entire federal office, the bureau of public debt, that collects money from hundreds of mr. garcias. this office in parkersburg, west virginia, was set up by president kennedy so citizens could pay down the national debt. this year alone, it has collected 7.7 milli$7.7 million, about 90 million since it was established. but $90 million is not that much, especially when you consider the federal deficit is $16 trillion and climbing. to retire the debt, every single american would have to pay $50,000. but garcia says you got to start somewhere. especially when washington won't. the partisan bickering has bothered him since 1992, when garcia first wrote his congressman, suggesting a formula to eliminate the debt. the depression-era kid and army vet says he wants to give back to a country that has given him so much, a feeling that is infectious. he knows his money wouldn't avert the fiscal c
not want to be identified. i said mrs. obama said she knows that the slave owners runs through her veins and she said that we were of the wrong side of history. it seems like a long time ago but it is not. >> host: in fact, you were able to work with to distant cousins. one is black and one is white fade did not know they were related but as a result of your research, they assisted. tell us about your relationship to each other and the book. >> guest: to have a contemporary narrative i thought what the book is about was the sweep of american history through one family with modern-day people grappling these two women i was trying to find the white ancestors and we thought it was someone in the slave owner family. i search for as many descendants as i could and the son of dolphus. i went back and forth to see these women of the family. they were older who really wanted to know. even though they knew what they found out would not be easy. >> host: have they rejected the story or is a universal embrace? the shields a family being the lineage represented by the former slave owner. >> guest: t
as you go forward. i asked to commend the commissioner for her work on prison, the petitions. i appreciate the progress made and encourage the commission to resolve these matters as quickly as possible. mr. chairman, members of the commission, thank you. >> thank you. mr. barton, you are recognized. >> thank you. i am tempted to yield back to mr. dingell and let him continue asking his yes or no questions. sooner or later, he will get to one they cannot answer. the chairman asked a question that i will put a different slant on. he referred to that part of the hr 3630 that the commission, in making these reassignment or reallocations, shall make every effort, every reasonable effort to preserve the existing population and coverage area for each broadcast licensee. on the next page, 72, said the paragraph 5, with regard to low- power television usage, it says nothing in this subsection shall be construed to alter the spectrum. in the fcc power point presentation in response to the question can low-power television participate in a reverse auction, the answer to that is no. i under
. they wrote books. >> they are in many cases quite frankly more interesting as human beings than her husband. if only because they are not first and foremost limited by political ambition. >> dolly was both a socially adept and politically savvy. >> dolly madison loved every minute of it. mrs. munro hated it. absolutely hated it spent she warned her husband. you know, you can't rule without including what women want and what women have to contribute spent during the statement he was a little breathless and it was too much looking that i think goes a little too fast. a change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> probably the most tragic of all of our first ladies, they never should have married. >> she later wrote in her memoir that she said i, myself, never made any decision. i only decided what was important, and went to resend it to my husband. >> you stop and think about how much power that is. it's a lot of power. >> prior to the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transform the way we look at these bugaboos, and made a possible for countless people to s
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